Medical News Today: Physical fitness linked to better brain function

The largest and most detailed study of its type concludes that there are links between physical fitness and improved cognitive performance. The researchers also show that this boost in mental powers is associated with white matter integrity.
Man preparing to run
A new study tests the theory that a fit body goes with a fit mind.

Over recent years, there has been a great deal of research into how bodily fitness might influence the mind.

For instance, studies have concluded that physical fitness can reduce the risk of dementia, relieve depressive symptoms, and more.

There is also evidence that physical activity boosts the cognitive performance of healthy individuals, people of different ages, and participants with cognitive impairments.

Similarly, some studies have shown positive links between physical fitness and changes in brain structure.

The authors of the latest study in this field, who published their findings in Scientific Reports, note that previous studies had certain limitations.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

In some cases, for instance, they did not account for variables that could play an important role.

As an example, researchers could associate low levels of physical fitness with higher blood pressure. If a study finds that high physical fitness has links with cognitive abilities, scientists could argue that in fact, it is lower blood pressure that boosts cognitive power.

The same could apply for several factors that have links with fitness, such as body mass index (BMI), blood glucose levels, and education status.

Also, most studies concentrate on only one marker of mental performance at a time, such as memory.

As the authors of the current study explain, “studies investigating associations between [physical fitness], white matter integrity, and multiple differential cognitive domains simultaneously are rare.”

A fresh look at fitness and the brain

The latest experiment, carried out by scientists from University Hospital Muenster in Germany, attempts to fill in some of the gaps. Using a large sample of healthy people, the scientists retested the links between physical fitness, brain structure, and a wide range of cognitive domains.

They also wanted to ensure that they accounted for as many confounding variables as possible. Additionally, the scientists wanted to understand whether the link between cognitive ability and physical fitness was associated with white matter integrity.

White matter in the brain relays messages between disparate parts of the brain and coordinates communication throughout the organ.

To investigate, the researchers took data from the Human Connectome Project, which includes MRI brain scans from 1,206 adults with an average age of 28.8.

Some of these participants also underwent further tests. In total, 1,204 participants completed a walking test in which they walked as quickly as they could for 2 minutes. The researchers noted the distance.

A total of 1,187 participants also completed cognitive tests. In these, the scientists assessed the volunteers’ memory, reasoning, sharpness, and judgment, among other parameters.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

‘Surprising’ results

Overall, the researchers showed that individuals who performed better in the 2-minute walking test also performed significantly better in all but one of the cognitive tasks.

Importantly, this relationship was significant even after controlling for a range of factors, including BMI, blood pressure, age, education level, and sex.

The researchers also associated this cognitive improvement with higher levels of fitness with improvements in the structural integrity of white matter. The authors conclude:

With the present work, we provide evidence for a positive relationship between [physical fitness] and both white matter microstructure as well as cognitive performance in a large sample of healthy young adults.”

“It surprised us to see that even in a young population cognitive performance decreases as fitness levels drop,” says lead researcher Dr. Jonathan Repple.

Dr. Repple continues, “We knew how this might be important in an elderly population, which does not necessarily have good health, but to see this happening in 30-year-olds is surprising.”

“This leads us to believe that a basic level of fitness seems to be a preventable risk factor for brain health.”

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

More questions

The current study has many strengths, not least the extensive database of MRIs. Dr. Repple explains that “normally when you are dealing with MRI work, a sample of 30 is pretty good, but the existence of this large MRI database allowed us to eliminate possibly misleading factors and strengthened the analysis considerably.”

However, because researchers carried out the tests at one point in time, it is not possible to see how fitness and cognitive ability changes over time. It is also not possible to say that becoming fitter causes a boost in cognitive ability.

Future studies will need to ask whether increasing an individual’s level of fitness also increases cognitive ability.

Also, by design, the current study only investigated healthy young people. How this interaction might be different in older populations or people with mental health conditions will require further work.

Taking previous studies into account, it is becoming increasingly clear that there are strong links between physical fitness and mental agility.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326310.php

Medical News Today: Hearing aids lower the chance of dementia, depression, and falling

A new study finds that hearing devices benefit older adults in multiple ways, from physical safety to brain health.
man wearing hearing aid
A recent study investigates the wide ranging impacts of wearing hearing aids.

Almost 1 in 4 people in the United States aged 65–74 have disabling hearing loss. In people over 75, the figure is 1 in 2.

Nonetheless, many people who would benefit from wearing a hearing aid do not wear them.

Experts have linked hearing loss to an increased likelihood of dementia, depression and anxiety, walking problems, and falling.

Now, a study in the Journal of American Geriatrics Society finds that using a hearing device makes these problems significantly less likely to occur.

Study lead Elham Mahmoudi, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan, explains:

“We already know that people with hearing loss have more adverse health events and more co-existing conditions, but this study allows us to see the effects of an intervention and look for associations between hearing aids and health outcomes.”

She continues, “Though hearing aids can’t be said to prevent these conditions, a delay in the onset of dementia, depression and anxiety, and the risk of serious falls could be significant both for the patient and for the costs to the Medicare system.”

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Looking into the data

The study, carried out at the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, looked at data from nearly 115,000 individuals who were over 66 years old and had hearing loss.

All the participants also had insurance through a Medicare Health Maintenance Organization (HMO).

The researchers chose Medicare HMOs because, unlike standard Medicare, they often cover hearing aid costs for members who have received a diagnosis with hearing loss from an audiologist.

The scientists tracked the participants’ health from 1 year before their diagnosis to 3 years afterward. This allowed researchers to pinpoint any new diagnoses of dementia, depression, anxiety, or fall injuries.

The researchers noted significant differences between the outcomes of those with hearing loss who did wear a hearing aid compared with those who did not.

Wearing a hearing aid reduced:

• the relative risk of being diagnosed with dementia — including Alzheimer’s — by 18%

• the relative risk of being diagnosed with depression or anxiety by 11%

• the relative risk of fall-related injuries by 13%

Previous research has looked into the links between hearing loss and dementia and mental health conditions. Some experts believe that social isolation, which sometimes comes with hearing loss, might result in less stimulation for the brain and, ultimately, cognitive decline.

Others have suggested that the deterioration of nerve impulses in the ear may be an indicator of a wider neural degeneration already underway.

Who gets a hearing aid?

The secondary goal of the study was to determine the adoption rate of hearing devices among different demographic groups.

Overall, the study found that just 12% of those diagnosed with hearing loss decide to use a hearing aid. The authors identified differences in adoption rates among different sexes, racial and ethnic backgrounds, and geographic locations.

• 13.3% of men with hearing loss in the United States are likely to acquire a hearing aid, as opposed to 11.3% of women with hearing loss.

• 13.6% of white participants with hearing loss received hearing aids, 9.8% of African Americans, and 6.5% of people with Latino heritage.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Clear as a bell

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved over-the-counter hearing aids for sale in 2020 in an effort to make hearing aids more widely available to people with mild-to-moderate hearing loss.

For older people with hearing loss, though, the study documents the value of acquiring a hearing aid. Mahmoudi says:

“Correcting hearing loss is an intervention that has evidence behind it, and we hope our research will help clinicians and people with hearing loss understand the potential association between getting a hearing aid and other aspects of their health.”

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326340.php

Medical News Today: How birds let squirrels know when it’s safe to relax

How birds let squirrels know when it’s safe to relax

<!–
(function() {
var useSSL = ‘https:’ == document.location.protocol;
var src = (useSSL ? ‘https:’ : ‘http:’) +
‘//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js’;
document.write(”);
})();
–><!– –><!– –>


For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

Welcome to Medical News Today

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

Healthline Media, Inc. is based in and operates this site from the United States. Any data you provide will be primarily stored and processed in the United States, pursuant to the laws of the United States, which may provide lesser privacy protections than European Economic Area countries.

By clicking “accept” below, you acknowledge and grant your consent for these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form. Learn more in our Privacy Policy.


Quantcast

deferCSS_place.appendChild(deferCSS);


Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326295.php

Medical News Today: How birds let squirrels know when it’s safe to relax

How birds let squirrels know when it’s safe to relax

<!–
(function() {
var useSSL = ‘https:’ == document.location.protocol;
var src = (useSSL ? ‘https:’ : ‘http:’) +
‘//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js’;
document.write(”);
})();
–><!– –><!– –>


For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

Welcome to Medical News Today

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

Healthline Media, Inc. is based in and operates this site from the United States. Any data you provide will be primarily stored and processed in the United States, pursuant to the laws of the United States, which may provide lesser privacy protections than European Economic Area countries.

By clicking “accept” below, you acknowledge and grant your consent for these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form. Learn more in our Privacy Policy.


Quantcast

deferCSS_place.appendChild(deferCSS);


Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326295.php

Medical News Today: Does poor oral health impact brain function?

Does poor oral health impact brain function?

<!–
(function() {
var useSSL = ‘https:’ == document.location.protocol;
var src = (useSSL ? ‘https:’ : ‘http:’) +
‘//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js’;
document.write(”);
})();
–><!– –><!– –>


For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

Welcome to Medical News Today

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

Healthline Media, Inc. is based in and operates this site from the United States. Any data you provide will be primarily stored and processed in the United States, pursuant to the laws of the United States, which may provide lesser privacy protections than European Economic Area countries.

By clicking “accept” below, you acknowledge and grant your consent for these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form. Learn more in our Privacy Policy.


Quantcast

deferCSS_place.appendChild(deferCSS);


Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326339.php

Medical News Today: What to know about cataract surgery

Cataracts are cloudy or opaque areas on the lens of the eye. These cloudy areas may affect a person’s vision.

Cataracts are slow forming. They usually develop in people aged 55 years and older, though younger people can also develop cataracts.

There is no known way to prevent cataracts from forming but wearing sunglasses and quitting smoking can help slow down their development. Currently, surgery to remove the lens and replace it with a synthetic one is the only treatment option available.

This article outlines the two different types of cataract surgery available. We describe the procedures and provide information on what people can expect before, during, and after surgery. We also outline the potential risks and complications involved.

Who might need surgery and why?

 a woman preparing for Cataract surgery
Cataracts usually require surgery when a person’s vision loss interferes with their everyday activities.

Not everyone who has cataracts needs cataract surgery. In the early stages, cataracts may cause only minor issues, such as nearsightedness. An eye doctor may be able to correct these symptoms with glasses alone.

Cataracts tend to be slow forming, causing very gradual worsening of vision. Surgery is usually only necessary when a person’s vision loss interferes with their everyday activities, such as reading or driving.

A person who has cataracts should talk to their doctor to find out if and when they may need surgery.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Types

According to the American Optometric Association, there are two types of cataract surgery: small incision cataract surgery and extracapsular surgery.

Small incision cataract surgery

Small incision cataract surgery (SICS) is the more common of the two procedures. SICS involves making a tiny incision into the cornea, which is the outermost layer of the eye. The cornea is the dome-shaped part of the eye that sits in front of the lens.

A surgeon then inserts a probe through the incision into the cornea. The probe uses ultrasound waves to break up the lens so that the surgeon can remove it in small pieces. Eye doctors call this process phacoemulsification.

The surgeon leaves the lens capsule, which is the thin outer membrane that covers the lens, in place and inserts a new, artificial lens into it. Typically, the incision in the cornea does not require any sutures.

In some cases, a person may be unable to receive an artificial lens due to other eye problems. In such cases, wearing contact lenses or eyeglasses may correct vision problems.

Extracapsular surgery

Extracapsular surgery involves making a large incision in the cornea. This allows the surgeon to remove the lens in one piece. As with SICS, they leave the lens capsule in place to support the new, artificial lens.

Typically, surgeons carry out this type of surgery when phacoemulsification cannot break up the cloudy spots.

a diagram of the eye.

Preparing for surgery

Before surgery, the doctor will ask the person about any medications they are taking. A person may need to stop taking certain medications on or before the day of the surgery. A doctor will outline which drugs a person should stop taking and may provide alternatives.

A doctor may also ask a person to avoid eating or drinking for up to 6 hours before the surgery.

Some people may also receive eye drops to use before the procedure.

Cataract surgery is a relatively quick procedure, and people can expect to be in and out of surgery in a very short time.

However, because the surgery directly affects vision, a person should arrange transport to get them to and from the clinic or surgery. They may also want to consider having someone stay with them to help out when they get home.


What to expect during and after surgery

Before surgery, the prep team will go over any final details about the person’s medical history and the surgery itself. Once they have prepared the person, the surgeon will begin the operation.

During the surgery, a person can expect the following:

  • A doctor will usually give the person medication to help them relax.
  • A doctor may use anesthetic eye drops or injections to numb the person’s eye.
  • The person remains awake during the procedure and may see light and general movement. However, they will not be able to see what the surgeon is doing.
  • The surgeon will make tiny incisions so they can reach the lens of the eye. They will then remove the lens and replace it with the synthetic one.
  • Typically, there is no need for stitches since the wound heals on its own.
  • The surgeon places a protective shield over the eye or eyes and sends the person to the recovery room.

The entire procedure usually takes around 15 minutes.

Recovery

A person will usually wait in the recovery room for about an hour following the procedure. The surgeon may have bandaged their eyes to help aid their recovery.

Once at home, a person should focus on preventing their eyes from becoming infected. They should avoid getting water in their eyes and should apply any eye drops as prescribed by their surgeon or doctor.

A person can continue with most daily activities, such as reading and watching TV. However, they should avoid heavy lifting and activities that can jar the eyes, such as jogging or basketball.

A surgeon will usually ask the person to return for check ups following surgery. This is to ensure that the eye is recovering as expected. Check ups usually take place the day after surgery, a week later, and several weeks after the surgery.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Risks and complications

Cataract surgery is an outpatient procedure that uses local anesthesia. As such, experts generally consider the procedure to be safe.

However, as with any medical procedure, there are risks of complications. Before a person decides on having cataract surgery, they should talk to their doctor about any potential complications.

Some common complications include:

People should be aware that certain medical conditions can increase the risk of complications from cataract surgery.

For example, a person with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is at increased risk of developing blindness following cataract surgery. People with AMD should discuss the potential risks and benefits with their doctor, before deciding whether to go ahead with the surgery.

Also, certain underlying eye problems, such as damage to the retina, might become apparent after the surgery.

Outlook

a patient with hyperkalemia speaking to doctor in office
If a person experiences complications following cataract surgery, they should speak to their doctor.

Assuming no complications develop, a person can expect to have much clearer vision following cataract surgery. However, if a person notices any side effects or complications, they should let their doctor know as soon as possible.

Some people may develop a secondary cataract. When this occurs, the lens membrane that the surgeon did not remove during the procedure begins to cloud over. According to the American Optometric Association, up to 50% of people who undergo cataract surgery may develop this condition.

A secondary cataract is treatable. Typically, a doctor will use laser treatment to create an opening in the clouded areas.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Takeaway

Cataract surgery is a common outpatient procedure. It is currently the only treatment for removing cataracts.

However, not everyone with cataracts will need surgery to have them removed. Some people may never lose their functional vision. Others may be able to correct their vision problems with glasses.

A person who is considering cataract surgery should talk to their doctor or optician about the potential risks and complications involved.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326346.php

Medical News Today: What does it feel like to be drunk? What you need to know

What does it feel like to be drunk? Effects and stages

<!–
(function() {
var useSSL = ‘https:’ == document.location.protocol;
var src = (useSSL ? ‘https:’ : ‘http:’) +
‘//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js’;
document.write(”);
})();
–><!– –><!– –>


For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

Welcome to Medical News Today

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

Healthline Media, Inc. is based in and operates this site from the United States. Any data you provide will be primarily stored and processed in the United States, pursuant to the laws of the United States, which may provide lesser privacy protections than European Economic Area countries.

By clicking “accept” below, you acknowledge and grant your consent for these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form. Learn more in our Privacy Policy.


Quantcast

deferCSS_place.appendChild(deferCSS);


Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326345.php

Medical News Today: How to eat 1,200 calories a day

This is a restrictive diet that requires a person to reduce their daily intake to 1,200 calories. For some people, 1,200 calories are too low and can lead to malnourishment.

Most nutrition labels base their recommendations on a 2,000 calorie diet. So, consuming 1,200 calories a day may involve a significant reduction in daily calories or may represent a slight reduction, depending on a person’s usual calorie intake.

Larger people, males, active individuals, breastfeeding or pregnant women, or those with certain medical conditions typically need more calories each day than other people. For those who need fewer calories, a 1,200 calorie diet is usually safe and potentially effective.

The number of calories a person needs each day depends on several factors, including their age, sex, activity level, and body size.

Basics

a woman food shopping for her 1,200 calorie diet
Age, sex, activity level, and body size all affect the number of calories a person should consume.

The average adult needs 1,600–3,000 calories every day to sustain their body weight. When a person consumes fewer calories than they need, the body begins to shed weight. It does this first by burning fat, and then eventually, other tissue, including muscle.

Most people need significantly more than 1,200 calories a day. Therefore, individuals who cut their daily intake to 1,200 calories can expect to lose some weight. This can be beneficial for people who are overweight or obese.

Some research suggests that a low calorie diet, such as a 1,200 calorie diet, offers additional health benefits. The National Institute of Health (NIH) note that in animal studies, lower calorie diets helped animals live longer and reduced the risk of diseases, such as cancer. Observational studies of groups that consume fewer calories suggest they are healthier.

However, this data is incomplete. Not all research on animals applies to humans. It is also possible that other factors, such as the specific foods that people eat when following a low calorie diet, may be responsible for improved health.

Some research also suggests that weight loss is about more than the calories a person consumes and burns. The body may change the rate at which it burns calories depending on how many calories a person eats. Therefore a person on a 1,200 calorie diet may burn fewer of them. This can slow weight loss.

It is possible that some people might not lose any weight or will need to remain on a restricted calorie diet for a significant time before seeing results. Weight loss will vary between people. For some people, an alternative approach, such as getting more exercise or consuming less sugar, might be a better option.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Meal ideas

People on a 1,200 calorie diet need to eat nutrient dense food to avoid feeling hungry and prevent malnourishment. Lean proteins tend to be very dense in nutrients and low in calories. White carbohydrates, such as white bread, by contrast, contain more calories and fewer nutrients.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) provide menu plans and other information about which foods to choose when following a 1,200 calorie diet.

Some other meal and food ideas are as follows:

Breakfast

oatmeal topped with blueberries
Oatmeal is a good breakfast option because it is packed with nutrients.
  • ½ cup shredded wheat cereal with 1 cup 1% milk
  • reduced fat yogurt with blueberries
  • berry and banana smoothie
  • hard boiled egg
  • 1 slice whole grain toast with peanut butter
  • 1 cup fat free cottage cheese with pineapple or strawberries
  • 1 cup of oatmeal with berries or a banana
  • ½ an avocado with 1 cup fat free cottage cheese

Lunch

  • A can or pouch of tuna, flavored with lemon juice or pepper
  • arugula salad with cranberries, walnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinaigrette, and a light sprinkling of Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup of Greek yogurt with honey, berries, and almonds
  • almond butter on a whole grain English muffin
  • 1 avocado with salsa
  • roast beef sandwich with low calorie mayonnaise, lettuce, and tomato on whole wheat bread

Dinner

  • 2 ounces (oz) salmon cooked in vegetable oil, with pepper or lemon juice
  • avocado toast on whole wheat bread with a side of green beans
  • sweet potato with margarine and 4 oz grilled chicken
  • ½ cup brown rice with 1 cup steamed vegetables and low fat cottage cheese
  • 1 cup whole wheat pasta with marinara sauce and three turkey or soy meatballs

Snack ideas

  • mixed nuts, not flavored or with added sugar
  • peach or mango, ideal for coping with sugar cravings
  • guacamole and raw veggies
  • ½ avocado with hot sauce
  • 1 serving unsalted canned mixed veggies
  • peanut butter on whole grain toast
  • 1 oz unsalted pistachios
  • 1/3 cup hummus with raw vegetables
  • string cheese
  • ½ cup sliced peaches and 1 oz prosciutto

Treats

Following a 1,200 calorie diet does not necessarily mean that a person has to avoid any specific foods entirely.

Allowing an occasional small treat may make it easier to stick to this restrictive diet. However, very high calorie foods, such as large muffins or slices of cake, can make it difficult to stay under 1,200 calories for the day while maintaining nutritional needs.

Treats that could work within a 1,200 calorie diet can include:

  • small servings of treat foods, such as a single cookie or five potato chips
  • popcorn, which is low in calories
  • kettle corn, which offers a sweet crunch but without all the calories of most sweet snacks
  • seasoned and flavored whole wheat crackers, which provide a salty crunch similar to potato chips

Eliminating empty calories from the diet can free up more space for treats. Some sources of empty calories include:

  • sweetened beverages, including sugar in coffee, alcohol, and sweetened fruit juices
  • white bread and pasta
  • soda
  • oils and butter that are high in saturated and trans fats
  • high calorie condiments


Safety

man discussing chronic prostatitis with male doctor in office
A person should talk to a doctor before starting a restrictive diet.

It is more difficult to get essential macronutrients, such as proteins and fats, and micronutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, on a low calorie diet. Therefore, it is important to read nutritional labels and talk to a doctor before trying this method of eating.

A dietitian can often help with creating a personalized eating plan.

People who should not eat very low calorie diets include:

  • those who are already underweight
  • females whose menstrual cycles have stopped because of being underweight or eating a very low calorie diet
  • individuals with eating disorders
  • pregnant or breastfeeding women
  • children, especially very young children
  • those with specific nutritional deficiencies or imbalances
  • people whose doctors have told them to avoid low calorie diets

A 1,200 calorie diet can potentially be unhealthful for some people. For example, a person who receives all of their calories from sweetened cereal, potato chips, or cookies may suffer from malnourishment.


Summary

Reducing the number of calories a person consumes can help them lose weight. Low calorie diets may also reduce the risk of certain diseases, and help a person see weight loss that encourages them to stick with the diet.

Weight is not the only or best measure of health. A person will not necessarily get healthier merely by losing weight. In some cases, weight loss can even make a person less healthy, especially if they eat unhealthful foods or do consume enough essential nutrients.

Also, sticking to a very low calorie diet can prove difficult, especially for people who struggle with food cravings. No matter what weight loss plan a person chooses, it is vital to choose a diet and exercise program that they can manage for the rest of their life.

A doctor or dietitian can help with planning a custom diet and nutrition plan that offers the right balance of treats and nutrient dense food.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326343.php

Medical News Today: What to know about condoms and allergies

Some people experience itchiness, redness, or swelling after using a condom. These can be symptoms of a latex allergy.

Latex comes from the milky sap of rubber trees. Manufacturers use latex in a variety of medical and commercial products, including condoms.

Natural rubber latex contains proteins that can cause allergic reactions. According to a 2016 review, these allergies may occur in around 4.3% of the world’s population.

Latex allergies develop gradually through repeated exposure to latex products. The symptoms can vary greatly in severity.

This article describes the symptoms of a latex allergy and looks into other allergic reactions that can occur during or after sex. We also discuss treatment options and when to see a doctor.

Symptoms

A person can have an allergic reaction after touching latex products or inhaling latex particles. The allergic reaction can vary in severity, causing a wide range of symptoms.

Mild allergic reaction

A mild allergic reaction to latex can cause immediate symptoms, such as:

Moderate allergic reaction

a condom which may cause an allergic reaction to
An allergic reaction to latex may cause itchiness, swelling, or redness.

Symptoms of a moderate reaction to latex include:

Severe allergic reaction

A person with a severe allergy may experience a life threatening reaction called anaphylaxis.

During anaphylaxis, the immune system triggers the release of large numbers of inflammatory compounds called histamines. These compounds cause rapid and severe inflammation throughout the body.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

The symptoms of anaphylaxis occur suddenly and can progress rapidly. People experiencing this require immediate treatment with epinephrine, a drug that counteracts allergic reactions.

A person should contact emergency services immediately if they or someone around them experiences anaphylaxis.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Diagnosing latex allergies

To diagnose a latex allergy, a doctor will review the person’s medical history and symptoms.

The doctor may also ask about the person’s job. People who regularly work with latex products have an increased risk of developing a latex allergy. Examples include healthcare workers and housekeeping personnel.

Additionally, an allergist may perform a skin prick test to check whether the person’s skin reacts to the proteins in latex. They may also test the person’s blood for the presence of latex antibodies.

Other types of condom-related allergy

If a person has an allergic reaction after using a condom, latex may not be the culprit.

Many condom manufacturers coat their products in substances such as spermicide and lubricant. These can contain chemicals that can irritate sensitive genital tissues.

Spermicide

man looking at label of skincare product in pharmacy to treat red spots on penis
A person can buy spermicide as a gel, foam, or suppository.

Spermicide is a form of birth control that prevents sperm from reaching the egg. Spermicide is available as a gel, foam, or suppository. People can also buy condoms coated in spermicide.

The active ingredient in many spermicides is nonoxynol-9, which kills sperm cells. When a person uses it frequently, however, it can cause irritation and soreness.

According to a report from the World Health Organization (WHO), frequent spermicide use may also increase a person’s risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) — such as gonorrhea and chlamydia — because it may make the vaginal mucosa more susceptible to invasion from microorganisms.

Lubricant

Personal lubricant can enhance sexual experience, but some lubricants contain chemicals such as propylene glycol and glycerol. These can cause skin irritation in some people.

Some condoms have lubricant coating. People who are sensitive or allergic to compounds in lubricants should use nonlubricated condoms.

Some lubricants also contain spermicides. In a 2018 study, researchers found that spermicide-containing lubricants can disrupt the structure of vaginal tissue cells. This can increase the risk of infections, such as bacterial vaginosis and STIs.


Latex-fruit syndrome

Some people with a latex allergy are also allergic to certain fruits. The name for this is latex-fruit syndrome.

The crossover occurs because certain fruits contain proteins that are similar to those in latex.

According to a 2016 review, people with latex allergies have a 35% risk of an allergy to one or more of the following fruits:

For the same reason, though less commonly, people with latex allergies are also allergic to peanuts, chestnuts, or both.

Treatments

The treatment for an allergy depends on its severity. In all cases, people should avoid exposure to anything that triggers a reaction.

Anyone who is sensitive to an ingredient in a lubricant or spermicide should look for products that do not contain the ingredient. People can also try natural lubricants, such as aloe vera gel.

Also, some condoms are made from materials other than latex, such as polyurethane or lambskin.

Individuals who experience severe allergic reactions may need to carry injectable epinephrine. If they have been exposed to an allergen, they should self-inject the epinephrine while waiting for emergency help to arrive.


Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

When to see a doctor

a couple speaking to a doctor.
People who have unusual vaginal or penile discharge after using a latex condom should speak to a doctor.

See a doctor if symptoms of an allergic reaction persist for several days after the last exposure to the suspected trigger. Persistent irritation can indicate an infection or another underlying issue.

Symptoms of an infection, such as an STI, can include:

  • unusual vaginal or penile discharge
  • frequent urination that may cause a painful burning sensation
  • foul smelling urine
  • pain in the stomach or lower back
  • nausea or vomiting
  • a fever

A doctor can identify the underlying cause with a physical exam and diagnostic tests. If a person has a genital infection, the doctor will likely prescribe a course of antibiotics.

If a person does not receive treatment for an infection, it may spread and lead to long term complications, such as infertility.

Anyone who experiences a severe allergic reaction should seek medical attention immediately.

Takeaway

Latex proteins and substances in lubricants and spermicides can all cause allergic reactions. These allergies can significantly affect a person’s sexual experience. In severe cases, they may even be life threatening.

It can help to check the labels on products for use during sex because some contain known allergens. To help prevent future allergic reactions, a person can try products that do not contain these ingredients.

A doctor can perform tests to confirm whether a person has a particular allergy. These tests involve analyzing a blood sample or exposing the skin to potential allergens.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326338.php

Medical News Today: Is there a cure for hepatitis C?

Is hepatitis C curable? What to know

<!–
(function() {
var useSSL = ‘https:’ == document.location.protocol;
var src = (useSSL ? ‘https:’ : ‘http:’) +
‘//www.googletagservices.com/tag/js/gpt.js’;
document.write(”);
})();
–><!– –><!– –>


For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

Welcome to Medical News Today

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

Healthline Media, Inc. is based in and operates this site from the United States. Any data you provide will be primarily stored and processed in the United States, pursuant to the laws of the United States, which may provide lesser privacy protections than European Economic Area countries.

By clicking “accept” below, you acknowledge and grant your consent for these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form. Learn more in our Privacy Policy.


Quantcast

deferCSS_place.appendChild(deferCSS);


Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326342.php