Medical News Today: Increased muscle power may prolong life

Increased muscle power may prolong life

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Medical News Today: MS: High-strength MRI may predict disease progression

MS: High-strength MRI may predict disease progression

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Medical News Today: More evidence that being active extends life

Exercise is well-known to improve health, but new research finds that simply adding more movement throughout the day can actually help people live longer.
Older adults limbering up
Move more, live longer, according to a recent study.

Those seeking to better their overall health often head to the gym — or, instead, become overwhelmed at the prospect and skip exercise altogether.

A new study has uncovered some hopeful news for those who may be hesitant to engage in an intense fitness regime, however.

Scientists at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences in Stockholm have found that increased physical activity of any type reduces overall mortality risk “regardless of age, sex, and starting fitness level.”

They recently presented their findings at EuroPrevent 2019, an event that the European Society of Cardiology held in Lisbon, Portugal.

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Maximal oxygen uptake

The scientists examined the health records of over 316,000 adults from Sweden who had their first occupational health screening in 1995–2015.

One item they calculated was maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max). This measurement determines how much oxygen the heart and lungs will provide the muscles during exercise. In general, the more someone exercises or moves around, the higher their VO2 max will be.

Their study also looked into Swedish national registries to find data on mortality rates and first-time cardiovascular events, whether they were fatal or nonfatal.

When they looked at the VO2 max and compared it with mortality rates and cardiovascular events, they found that all-cause mortality rates fell by 2.8 percent and cardiovascular events fell by 3.2 percent for each milliliter increase in VO2 max.

The team saw these benefits across all sexes, ages, and starting fitness levels.

“People think they have to start going to the gym and exercising hard to get fitter,” explains study author Dr. Elin Ekblom-Bak, of the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences.

For most people, just being more active in daily life — taking the stairs, exiting the metro a station early, cycling to work — is enough to benefit health since levels are so low to start with. The more you do, the better.”

Dr. Elin Ekblom-Bak

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Exercise for heart health

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend engaging in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, which is around 30 minutes per day for 5 days per week.

Exercise has a range of benefits, such as lowering the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure problems, Alzheimer’s disease, some types of cancer, and stroke.

It can also improve sleeping habits and have positve effects in the brain, including better cognition, memory, attention, and processing speed. It can improve bone health and balance and can reduce the impact of depression and anxiety.

A recent report from the AHA revealed that almost half of all adults in the United States have some type of cardiovascular disease.

According to the most recent figures available, heart disease caused the most deaths in the U.S. in 2016, and stroke was the fifth most common cause of death.

Public health experts continue to work on finding ways to reduce cardiovascular disease rates, and this research could certainly help those who are hesitant to start up an exercise program with a goal of 150 active minutes each week.

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Move more

The research did uncover that those on the low end of VO2 max showed a greater reduction of risk than those at the high end, but the participants saw positive changes no matter how physically fit they were. A little more movement here and there can add up and benefit someone’s overall health.

“Increasing fitness should be a public health priority and clinicians should assess fitness during health screening,” Dr. Ekblom-Bak explains.

“Our previous research has shown that fitness levels in the general population have dropped by 10 percent in the last 25 years. In 2016–2017, almost every second man and woman had a low fitness level, so this is a huge problem.”

“Fitness is needed for daily activities,” concludes Dr. Ekblom-Bak. “Poor fitness is as detrimental as smoking, obesity, and diabetes even in otherwise healthy adults, yet unlike these other risk factors it is not routinely measured.”

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324987.php

Medical News Today: Through my eyes: My first 48 hours with hearing aids

As an editor and writer for Medical News Today, I am constantly exploring the causes and effects of a range of different diseases and conditions.
Through my eyes hearing aid
At the time of writing, I have been wearing my hearing aids for 2 days, yet their impact is already astounding.

From time to time, I find that a particular article will pop up and alert me to my own health issues. And that is exactly what happened when I looked into deafness and hearing loss around a year ago.

I was going through the questions a doctor might ask during diagnosis, and I was staggered to find that as few as 5 percent of them did not apply to my own ears.

Sure enough, I took these issues to a doctor, and entered the referral process for treatment by an ear, nose, and throat specialist.

After 8 months of waiting, I now have two hearing aids. At the time of writing, I have only been wearing them for 2 days, yet their impact is already significantly greater than I could ever have imagined.

A gradual, creeping impact on your life

To recap, I’m lucky enough to have retained at least half of my hearing in each ear. At present, I can lead a mostly active, healthy life, I don’t need to communicate with sign language, and my work is unaffected.

However, it’s all too easy to dismiss the impact of a gradual, creeping condition such as hearing loss. It can develop suddenly, or, as in my case, take 20 years to reach a diagnosable level.

I will be 30 years old this year, and those 20 years mark a hugely important period in anyone’s life.

Whether you are trying to make an impact as a young professional starting out, rounding off your formal education, building a family, or all of the above, you will undoubtedly be taking account of parts of your life that are becoming increasingly important and complex.

Communication is a huge part of navigating this formative stage. If any element of communication is lacking, it can have a significant impact on the way your personality develops, and the methods you use to connect with the outside world.

The big kicker with gradual-onset hearing loss is that you are not aware of how it’s changing you until the physical symptoms have become moderate to severe.

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Socializing becomes too much of a risk

Every pang of guilt or embarrassment after saying “what?” or “huh?” might lead to another night when you don’t risk going out to socialize. You end up distancing softly-spoken colleagues, friends, and even family members, simply because the effort it takes to process their speech can become draining.

I’ve forgotten what it’s like to chat with a friend at a concert or even a bar. Very often, I will have great difficulty separating conversational frequencies from noises in the environment, making it almost impossible to fully focus on what people are saying.

Something as trivial as needing subtitles when watching television programs and movies with other people can create an isolating feeling of being stigmatized.

Even though your friends are probably understanding, and although subtitles exist to significantly improve the viewing experience for people who cannot hear as well as others, it can still be hard to ignore the underlying feeling of being ‘different.’

As a result of these fleeting moments and hang-ups, I developed subtle, invisible coping mechanisms to anchor my social interactions.

For example, I cycle between a set of 10–15 stock phrases that I wheel out based on tone of voice and general context.

“Absolutely!”

“100 percent!”

“I can fully understand that.”

“Tell me about it!”

None of these seem out of place in a conversation. However, once they become a substitute for genuine responses and coherent conversational flow, they develop into a cornerstone of shame and awkwardness in daily encounters.

Until you start looking at hearing loss as a condition, it simply feels like part of your worldview. Even if it hasn’t yet reached the stage of impairing daily function, it can still strip at least 30–50 percent of the human experience from your day.

After writing the MNT article on hearing loss, I followed this journey to hearing aids on my doctor’s recommendation.

Even though I’m missing only one layer of frequencies, the difference is remarkable.

Even food comes alive with hearing aids

My new hearing aids are discreet yet powerful — sometimes, to my underused ears, excessively so.

Through my eyes hearing loss dogs
The hearing aids are discreet yet powerful, sometimes amplifying sounds too much.

A packet of chips opening 20 feet away sounds like it’s crinkling next to my head; I can hear the wheels of a stroller from a balcony five floors up; even the cacophony during bathroom breaks sounds like a National Geographic documentary.

There are unexpected changes, too. My experience of food has completely altered — the additional frequencies adding a lightness of bite and extra crunch that I was previously unaware of.

Using a hearing loop system for the first time at a concert was emotionally overwhelming. My balance and spatial awareness have also greatly improved in these first few days of wearing my hearing aids.

My hearing no longer feels impaired — that is, until I remove the hearing aids. Those few moments in the day without them, such as going to the gym or grabbing a shower, are now pretty draining by comparison.

However, I have heard about 20 birdsongs for the first time in the last 48 hours, and I’ve listened to the phasing hiss of the sea as I’ve never listened before.

And, I was hit by a hailstorm that might genuinely be the single most impressive thing I’ve ever heard, although until 2 days ago, the bar was not all that high.

I have a lot to learn about life with hearing aids, but my first lesson was that no one close to me sees it as a negative life event. Everyone has been congratulating me as if I’ve just become a parent for the first time.

I’ve realized that however self-conscious you might feel about wearing hearing aids, people only see it as a connection with the world, and this is a huge deal. I see my hearing aids as an opportunity, rather than as debilitating or cumbersome devices.

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My hearing aids are a game-changer

There’ll be occasional squeals of feedback, and keeping them wedged in my ears can be a challenge, especially while moving around. However, I’m in the early stages of treatment and already connecting with the world more closely.

While my hearing aids are not perfect yet, they remain a genuine game-changer.

If conversations have started to become a struggle for you, or if you’ve passed on getting a hearing aid because of the visual aspect, then I urge you to look into your options. Visit your doctor, speak to your insurer about coverage, and weigh up hearing assistance as a real option.

Sound is 20 percent of your experience as a human. Conversation, music, and background noise are all part of keeping a steady headspace and progressing with your day. Protecting and enhancing that is a life-changing step to take for people who can’t process sound as well as others do.

I cannot wait to stick these bad boys in upon waking up tomorrow and seeing what else I can discover for the first time.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324995.php

Medical News Today: Most people who die of natural causes do not seek medical help

Researchers have found that 70 percent of adults who died from natural causes had not seen a healthcare provider in the 30 days before their death.
a senior woman sitting in bed
A new study tries to make sense of premature death.

Scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences (IFS) in Texas have uncovered some of the key factors related to premature deaths among adults.

They have now published their results in the journal PLOS One.

A 2016 report that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) compiled found that more than 2 million people in the United States die every year.

The leading causes of death in the U.S. are heart disease and cancer, with around 635,000 deaths and 600,000 deaths per year, respectively.

Before getting into the details of the study, it is important to understand what constitutes a natural cause of death: A natural cause of death rules out the involvement of external causes such as an accident, a murder, or a drug overdose.

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Identifying modifiable factors

The team wanted to identify modifiable characteristics that could help healthcare providers prevent deaths from natural causes. To do this, the scientists focused on the 1,282 adults who died in Harris County, TX, in 2013. They analyzed autopsy reports and legal death investigation records.

One study, from 2015, found a significant increase in all-cause mortality of non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century.

This increase seems to be due to rising death rates from drug and alcohol poisonings, suicide, and chronic liver disease.

“I had noticed younger people dying when I worked at the IFS, so I set out to identify the causes in Harris County,” says lead study author Stacy Drake, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center.

The team identified common modifiable characteristics within two categories that are growing in prevalence: deaths from natural causes and drugs. “We need to dive into what is going on with these folks and find out where we can break the chain of events leading to their deaths,” says Drake.

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Links to poverty and healthcare access

The researchers discovered that 912 deaths were due to natural causes and 370 were due to drug overdoses.

Study co-author Dr. Dwayne A. Wolf, Ph.D. — Harris County IFS deputy chief medical examiner — collaborated with Drake’s team.

As medical examiners, we perform autopsies and present findings in court. As physicians, we appreciate the opportunity to translate our findings into improvements in healthcare, in injury prevention, or even in preventing deaths.”

Dr. Dwayne A. Wolf, Ph.D.

Deaths to natural causes included alcohol use, tobacco use, substance use, and documented past medical history. The top causes of death were linked to the circulatory system, digestive system, and endocrine and metabolic conditions.

The data also revealed that more than half of these people did not have a healthcare provider.

“They had symptoms and knew they were getting worse,” explains Drake. “Yet, they didn’t seek the attention of a healthcare provider. We need to conduct further research to answer the question of ‘why?'”

In particular, the team focused on three areas where the number of premature deaths was higher: North Central (Trinity Gardens), South (Sunnyside), and East (Baytown). Here, education, income, and employment are comparatively low, and there is a lack of access to healthcare services.

“Overall, they’re dying of diseases that we treat every day,” Drake concludes.

Of the 370 drug-related deaths, most of them were accidental and a very small number were down to suicide.

The researchers found cocaine, opioids, antidepressants, and alcohol in toxicology tests. They also showed that white people, compared with black people, were more than twice as likely to die from drug-related deaths.

The authors hope that “these findings may influence the initiation of interventions for medically underserved and impoverished communities.”

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324994.php

Medical News Today: Vitamin D may help fight colorectal cancer

Vitamin D may help fight colorectal cancer

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Medical News Today: What are the nutritional benefits of peanuts?

Peanuts have a strong nutritional profile. They are an excellent source of plant-based protein, fiber, and many key vitamins and minerals.

Peanuts come in many forms, including roasted, salted, chocolate-coated, and as peanut butter. Different types have different nutritional profiles and various health benefits.

Along with their healthful nutritional profile, peanuts are a calorie-rich food, so they are most healthful when enjoyed in moderation.

In this article, we provide the nutritional profile of peanuts, their health benefits, and how different types compare.

Nutritional breakdown

Peanuts in a bowl on wooden table top down view.
Peanuts are most healthful when they are in their raw form.

Peanuts are an especially good source of healthful fats, protein, and fiber. They also contain plenty of potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, and B vitamins. Despite being high in calories, peanuts are nutrient-rich and low in carbohydrates.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 100 grams of raw peanuts contain 567 calories and the following nutrients in grams (g), milligrams (mg), or micrograms (mcg):

The mixture of healthful fats, protein, and fiber in peanuts means they provide nutritional benefits and make a person feel fuller for longer. This makes peanuts a healthful, go-to snack when people compare them with chips, crackers, and other simple carbohydrate foods.

Below, we discuss the benefits of key nutrients in peanuts.


1. Protein

Peanuts are an excellent source of plant-based protein, offering 25.8 g per 100 g of peanuts, or around half of a person’s daily protein needs.

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein in adults is:

  • 46 g for women
  • 56 g for men

Protein is essential for building and repairing body cells. The amount of protein a person needs varies, depending on their age and activity level.


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2. Healthful fats

Peanut butter on toast with fruit for breakfast
Peanuts contain healthful fats that are an essential part of a nutritious diet.

Fatty acids are an essential part of every diet. Most of the fats in peanuts are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are a healthful type of fat.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), consuming monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats instead of saturated and trans fats can improve a person’s blood cholesterol levels. This, in turn, lowers the risk of heart disease and stroke.

There is also a small amount of saturated fat in peanuts. Saturated fat is less healthful than unsaturated or polyunsaturated. Doctors link too much saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, it is best to eat peanuts in moderation to get their optimal health benefits.


3. Dietary fiber

Peanuts are a good source of dietary fiber. They contain 8.5 g per 100 g, which around one-quarter of a male’s recommended fiber intake or one-third for females.

The current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults get the following amounts of fiber per day:

  • 34 g for men
  • 28 g for women

Fiber is a heart-healthful nutrient. The AHA report that eating fiber-rich foods improves blood cholesterol levels and lowers the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

Which types of peanuts are most healthful?

Raw peanuts are the most healthful variety. Peanut butter is a great choice, offering a healthy nutritional profile and a range of health benefits. Learn about the health benefits of peanut butter.

People can also buy roasted, salted peanuts. Eating these types is okay in moderation, though consuming too much sodium is linked with high blood pressure and heart disease.

The AHA recommend an ideal limit of 1,500 mg of sodium per day, and no more than 2,300 mg of sodium — equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt — especially for people with high blood pressure.

Where possible, choose raw peanuts with the skin attached. Peanut skins contain antioxidants. Antioxidants help protect the body’s cells from damage from free radicals. Producers usually remove the skins from most roasted or salted peanut.

People can enjoy peanuts and peanut butter in moderation as a snack throughout the day. In main meals, peanuts make a great addition to salads or Thai dishes.


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Health benefits of peanuts

Woman at desk at work snacking and eating on peanut
Eating peanuts may help with managing blood sugar levels.

Eating peanuts has three main health benefits:

  • supporting heart health
  • maintaining a healthy weight
  • managing blood sugar

The following sections discuss these benefits and the science behind them.

1. Supporting heart health

Peanuts contain more healthful monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats than they do saturated fats. This fat ratio makes peanuts better for the heart than fat sources with a higher proportion of saturated fats.

A 2014 study found that eating 46 g of peanuts or peanut butter each day may improve heart health for people with diabetes.

2. Maintaining a healthy weight

Because peanuts are full of healthful fats, protein, and fiber, they make a satisfying snack. Eating them in moderation may help a person maintain a healthy weight.

Research found that women who ate nuts, including peanuts, twice a week had a slightly lower risk of weight gain and obesity over 8 years than those who rarely ate nuts.

A large-scale study found that eating peanuts and other nuts may reduce a person’s risk of obesity over 5 years.

3. Managing blood sugar levels

Peanuts are an excellent food for people with diabetes or a risk of diabetes. Peanuts have a low glycemic index (GI), meaning they do not cause big spikes in blood sugar levels.

Nutritionists see foods with a GI of 55 or lower as low-GI foods, and those with a GI of more than 70 are high-GI foods. Peanuts have a GI score of 23, making them a low-GI food. Learn more about the GI scale here.

Peanuts help control blood sugar levels because they are relatively low in carbohydrates but high in protein, fat, and fiber. Fiber slows down the digestive processes, allowing a steadier release of energy, and protein takes longer to break down than simple carbohydrates.

Research suggests that eating peanut butter or peanuts may help women with obesity and a higher type 2 diabetes risk to manage their blood sugar levels.

Risks and considerations

Peanuts contain proteins called arachin and conarachin. Some people are severely allergic to these proteins. For these people, peanuts can cause a life-threatening allergic reaction.

Because peanuts are high in calories, it is sensible to eat them in moderation as part of a balanced diet. Consuming too many calories may lead to weight gain. This is true regardless of whether the foods those calories come from are nutritious or not.

Roasted, salted peanuts may be less healthful than raw peanuts due to their high sodium content. That said, if people consume them in moderation, they can enjoy them as a part of a healthful, balanced diet.


Summary

Peanuts are a nutrient-rich source of protein, dietary fiber, and healthful fats. Eating them in moderation, as part of a balanced diet, may:

  • support heart health
  • help a person maintain a healthy weight
  • help a person manage their blood sugar levels

Peanuts are a good option for people with diabetes for these reasons. They are also a good snack option for those looking to reduce carbohydrates and increase healthful fat intake.

For their optimal health benefits, choose raw peanuts with the skin on. Raw peanuts with their skin on are high in cell-defending antioxidants.

Roasted, salted peanuts are high in sodium, which health professionals link to heart disease. That said, eating roasted, salted peanuts as part of a balanced diet is okay.

As with most foods, the key to enjoying peanuts is eating them in moderation as part of a healthful, calorie-controlled diet.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325003.php

Medical News Today: Breast cancer: Reducing this amino acid could make drugs more effective

Breast cancer: Reducing this amino acid could make drugs more effective

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Medical News Today: The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes

Having type 2 diabetes should not mean having to avoid delicious food. Vegetables should be a central part of the diet for people with type 2 diabetes and can be delicious and filling.

No food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthful eating for people with diabetes is all about controlling portion size and preparing a careful balance of nutrients.

The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in nitrates that reduce blood pressure.

In this article, we look at the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes. We also explain why vegetables are so important for people who are monitoring blood sugar, and we offer a range of tasty meal ideas.

Best vegetables for type 2 diabetes

Eating a wide variety of foods, including a mix of certain vegetables, can help people with diabetes stay healthy while enjoying a range of meals.

Low-GI vegetables

Vegetable skewers
Low-GI vegetables can help prevent sugar spikes.

The GI ranking of a food shows how quickly the body absorbs glucose from that food. The body absorbs blood sugar much faster from high-GI foods than low-GI foods.

People with diabetes should eat vegetables with a low GI score to avoid blood sugar spikes.

Not all vegetables are safe for people with diabetes, and some have a high GI. Boiled potatoes, for example, have a GI of 78.

The GI scores for some popular vegetables are:

  • Frozen green peas score 39 on the GI index.
  • Carrots score 41 when boiled and 16 when raw.
  • Broccoli scores 10.
  • Tomatoes score 15.

Low-GI vegetables are also safe for people with diabetes, such as:

It is important to note that the GI gives a relative value to each food item and does not refer to the specific sugar content. Glycemic load (GL) refers to how much glucose will enter the body in one serving of a food.

High-nitrate content

Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in specific vegetables. Some manufacturers use them as preservatives in foods.

Eating natural, nitrate-rich foods can reduce blood pressure and improve overall circulatory health. People should choose vegetables with naturally high nitrate content, rather than those with nitrate that manufacturers have added during processing.

Nitrate-rich vegetables include:

Protein

Protein-rich foods help people feel fuller for longer, reducing the urge to snack between meals.

Daily protein recommendations depend on a person’s size, sex, activity level, and other factors. People can speak to a doctor for the best insight on what their ideal daily protein intake should be.

Pregnant or lactating women, highly active people, and those with large bodies need more protein than others.

Vegetables higher than some others in protein include:

Fiber

Fiber should come from real, natural food, not supplements, making vegetables essential in a glucose-controlled diet. Fiber can help reduce constipation, reduce levels of “bad” cholesterol, and help with weight control.

The American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics say that the correct amount of fiber per day is 25 grams (g) for women and 38 g for men.

This recommendation varies, depending on body size, overall health, and similar factors.

Vegetables and fruits with high fiber content include:

  • carrots
  • beets
  • broccoli
  • artichoke
  • Brussels sprouts
  • split peas
  • avocados


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Why choose vegetables?

Grocer carrying box of vegetables
Vegetables provide safe carbohydrates for people with diabetes.

Good carbohydrates provide both nutrients and energy, making them a safe, efficient, and nutritious food choice for people with diabetes.

Low-to-moderate-GI vegetables, such as carrots, improve blood glucose control and reduce the risk of weight gain.

Nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who also have a higher than usual risk of cardiovascular disease. This fact remains true despite their high carbohydrate content.

The key to effective food management is to boost vegetable intake and reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewhere in the diet by cutting down on foods such as bread or sugary snacks.

A person with diabetes should include sufficient amounts of fiber and protein in the diet. Many dark, leafy greens are rich in fiber, protein, and other vital nutrients.

Fiber can help control blood glucose levels. Vegetables, fruits, nuts, and legumes have excellent fiber content.

Vegetables also support improved levels of healthy cholesterol and lower blood pressure. As with protein, fiber can make people feel fuller for longer.

Eating vegan or vegetarian with diabetes

Eating a vegan or vegetarian diet can prove challenging for people with diabetes. Animal products generally have the most protein, but vegans completely avoid dairy and other animal products.

Some of the most protein-rich vegan options include:

A vegan or vegetarian person who has diabetes can eat a balanced diet. Whole grains, nuts, seeds, and lentils offer plenty of protein often with low calories.


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Healthful diabetes meals

People cooking recipe in kitchen
Cooking nutritious meals with vegetables will help manage the symptoms of diabetes.

Any meal that blends several of the above ingredients will offer excellent nutrition. To keep meals healthful and flavorsome, people with diabetes should avoid using too much added salt or relying on prepackaged ingredients that are high in sodium.

Careful calorie counting will also support glucose control. Excess calories can turn an otherwise healthful meal into a risk factor for excessive weight gain and worsened insulin sensitivity.

Some simple meal options include:

  • avocado, cherry tomato, and chickpea salad
  • hard-boiled eggs and roasted beets with black pepper and turmeric
  • low-sodium cottage cheese spread on toasted sweet potato slices. Add black or cayenne pepper to boost the flavor
  • tofu burger patty with spinach and avocado
  • spinach salad with chia seeds, tomatoes, bell peppers, and a light sprinkling of goat’s cheese
  • quinoa and fruit added to unsweetened Greek yogurt with cinnamon
  • quinoa with pepper or vinaigrette season, or on its own
  • almond butter on sprouted-grain bread with a topping of avocado and crushed red pepper flakes

Balancing less healthful foods with more nutritious ones is a way to remain healthy while also satisfying a sweet tooth. For instance, eating a cookie or two per week is usually fine when balanced by a high-fiber, plant-rich diet.

People with diabetes should focus on a balanced, overall approach to nutrition. There is a risk that forbidding certain foods can make them feel even more appealing. This can lead to poorer control over food choices and raised blood sugar over time.

Vegetables are bursting with nutrition, but they are just one part of managing a lifestyle with diabetes.

People should eat a wide variety of foods from all food groups and plan to stop eating 2–3 hours before bedtime, in most cases, as 12 or more hours of nighttime fasting helps glucose control.

A doctor or dietitian can provide an individualized diabetes meal plan to ensure that a person with the condition receives a wide enough range of nutrients in healthful proportions.

Q:

Are fruits as good as vegetables for people with diabetes?

A:

Fruits are higher in digestible carbohydrates than most vegetables. While fruit is rich in water, fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, there are likely more, non-starchy vegetables that can be more easily or more liberally incorporated in the diet of someone with diabetes with less consequences to blood sugar. That said, whole fruit is always the preferred choice over other forms of sweets, as it will impact blood sugar less. For those looking to prevent diabetes, research has consistently shown that fruit intake reduces diabetes risk.

Natalie Butler, RD, LD
Answers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

Source Article from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317225.php

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